Student projects

Bioanthropology classes study gorilla behavior at the Memphis Zoo (coming soon: A Day in the Life of Penny) and participate in historic archaeology in Holly Springs. 

 

Undergraduate projects span the globe, looking at ancient migration in Mesoamerica, modern geophagy ('dirt eating') in Africa and the US South, new techniques for aging ancient dogs, and even analysis of the dental microbiome using aDNA from dental calculus.

Graduate students conduct research at home and abroad, learning the applications of biogeochemical methods to questions about human behavior, from how bone tools were made to where people moved and its potential effects on health and burial practices. 

 

Craft House excavations in Holly Spring, MS
Craft House excavations in Holly Spring, MS

UM students explore historic foodways at the 1850s Craft House as part of the Behind the Big House tour.

Child's prints on 1850s UM building (J. DiBiasie-Sammons)
Child's prints on 1850s UM building (J. DiBiasie-Sammons)

Enslaved children participated in the brickmaking process and this brick is a witness to the people who built the earliest building on the University of Mississippi campus.

Memphis Zoo gorilla exhibits stereotypic behavior
Memphis Zoo gorilla exhibits stereotypic behavior

UM students observed regurgitation and re-ingestion of foods, a behavior exhibited by many zoo animals.

The structure of edible clay baked and eaten the Zambia
The structure of edible clay baked and eaten the Zambia

Students look at the health benefits and risks of consumption of clay soils, a cultural practice in many parts of the world.